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Celebrity Plastic Surgery Secrets Revealed From The Worlds Best Plastic Surgeons

For some even the thought of having plastic surgery can chill down their spine. However, for others, it’s a die-hard professional necessity to look as young as possible or their career might get into the risk  –losing their job and the ability to earn even daily bread. This year in the February issue, Allure magazine released an article titled– “Secrets of Celebrity Plastic Surgeons” by Kristin Perrotta who gave both a humorous and realistic account of what really goes on in the world of plastic surgery.

Welcome to the world of celebrity plastic surgeons. Treating Oscar winners, billionaires, royalty, head of state. Meeting, greeting, injecting and yes, of course, surgery on—VVVIP’s the world over. The things that you mustn’t miss to see. The egos you have to nurture and the reckless tantrums you should tolerate. And, yes, all those bald-faced lies you should witness.

Here are brief excerpts from the magazine:

“A 29-YEAR-OLD ACTRESS CAME IN FOR A FACELIFT.”

Andrew Frankel, associate clinical professor of otolaryngology at University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine in Los Angeles and a facial plastic surgeon in Beverly Hills says, “I had a 29-year-old actress come in for a facelift because she didn’t like how she looked on a magazine cover.” ‘If I do it when I’m 29, I’ll always look 29,’ she said. “I had to explain that it doesn’t work out that way,” He also adds, “It’s almost as if they think the year that you have your surgery is when you stop aging. You have to just say no.”

“THEY’LL DENY IT TO THE HILT.”

Robert Singer, a clinical professor of plastic surgery at the University of California, San Diego, and the former president of  American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery revealed: “I’ve had situations where actresses have said that they’d never have plastic surgery and they’ve just had a facelift.”

“A LOT OF WHAT YOU READ IN THE TABLOIDS IS REALLY TRUE.”

“We have five exits from our building – and we use them cleverly to divert and decoy the paparazzi,” told Frankel. “The tabloids aren’t all bad – a lot of their news is true. I can tell you firsthand.”

“IT’S AN UNDERGROUND, INVITE-ONLY KIND OF THING.”

Jason Diamond, a plastic surgeon with offices in the Beverly Hills  New York City and Dubai says, “I go to Dubai every three months and Moscow once a year.” He also says “In the Middle East and New York I have a license. But in Russia, I go without a license because most of it is underground. When I go to Moscow I have to be very discreet.”

“THEY HAVE TO BE THE SAME AGE FOR 35 YEARS.”  

“For the average movie star, the more their life demands that they are in public and making appearances, the harder it is to find a window to perform a procedure,” asserted Frankel. “So while doing subtle changes in stages is a nice idea, you really have to get it all done in one procedure. Soap opera stars are the exception. They’re not supposed to look any different from day-to-day. Those changes need to be subtle and HDTV is extremely revealing.”

“THERE ARE ANATOMICAL LIMITATIONS.”

Simeon Wall Jr., assistant clinical professor of plastic surgery at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas told, “Celebrities tend to have expectations that are out of line with reality because they’re used to just being able to have everything. They don’t understand that this is a surgical procedure. For example, someone with a boxy waist or narrow buttocks won’t understand that you can’t give them the shape they want. They don’t like hearing any of that.”

“SHE IS TO BREASTS WHAT MOZART WAS TO MUSIC.”

Steven Teitelbaum, an associate clinical professor of plastic surgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA says,“Celebrities do not say who they don’t want to look like.” He also adds,“Instead, they’ll say they like Kate Hudson’s boobs for their size and perkiness. But the name most mentioned as having perfect breasts—though bigger than some patients want—is Emily Ratajkowski. I tell patients, ‘I get it. But I’d be misleading you if I suggested that you’d look like her. She’s a genetic rarity; she is to breasts what Mozart was to music and Usain Bolt is to sprinting.’ ”

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